From Dropbox to BitTorrent Sync

I’ve been a fan of Dropbox for years, mainly due to how dead-simple it is to use and how well It Just Works. Lately, Amazon and Google have been trying to move in on the cloud storage game with their own offerings, and of course there’s Box, Ubuntu One, and other systems already competing. Obviously, the ability to sync files across your machines is super-handy.

My main problem with Dropbox has always been how little space you can get. Right now I have 4.42 GB of space in my personal account, over and above the standard free amount due to several referrals and uploading photos and trying Dropquest 2012. It’s a decent amount of space, but … Google Drive kicks you off with 15 GB right away, and Amazon even starts at 5 GB. Box starts you with 10 GB. Dropbox still starts you with just 2 GB.

I would have figured that Dropbox would start bumping things up with the growing competition, but instead their latest announcement was for some sort of photo gallery thing. I mean, I guess they have the whole file sync thing down pat so they need to branch out, but I don’t get how a gallery app is a logical next step. I really want more gigabytes. I could start using the storage in new broad ways.

A while back a friend of mine had me set up BitTorrent Sync in order to transfer some files. Unlike all of those other systems I mentioned, this one has no central server. Instead, your files are shared democratically across all computers you have linked using the same shared secret. As a bonus, all files are encrypted during transport, so that plus the lack of a central server means your files are better protected from anyone who might like to see them without your permission. That’s all fine and good, but what I really care about is that the space is unlimited, since you bring the storage.

So, I’m transitioning from Dropbox to BT Sync. Right now I have two Dropbox accounts, one for work and one for personal use. I’ll have the work one switched over relatively quickly, and the personal one before much longer. I’ll leave the personal one alive for a few isolated items, and as an alternative for cases where BT Sync isn’t as convenient (e.g., web access). Plus, I worked hard for those extra 2.42 GB, dangit.

I have an Ubuntu machine at home, and I installed BT Sync there to take the place of the central server in my scheme. If nothing else, it serves as a backup location for the files in my Sync folders. Although the system really doesn’t need an anchor like that, it helps me transition over. A better option would be to sync to a trusted friend’s systems, which would give me offsite backup. If there were a way to encrypt those copies, it’d be just about perfect.

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