Monthly Archives: March 2015

Protecting the master branch from you

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. – Benjamin Franklin

Eighteen new commits on master with questionable commit messages. Yay.

One of the most critical things you do when working with remote git repositories is pushing your changes to master. Once that is done, everyone else can see what you’ve done. And, if you mess that up, everyone sees your mistakes, and fixing it swiftly becomes a trial requiring team-wide coordination and the ugly push --force command. A couple of months ago finally messed that up one too many times, so I decided to use Git’s pre-push hook to protect the master branch from my own mistakes.

Essentially, I wanted Git to put up roadblocks to me pushing to master. The pre-push hook can perform checks and reject a push attempt purely on the client side, so it’s a perfect spot for implementing those roadblocks. I took a hook from this useful page and augmented it. While the original hook merely asks if you’re sure you want to push, I added two more checks, neither of which can be overridden interactively.

  1. A file named “ok-to-push” must exist. If it doesn’t, the hook rejects the push. This forces me to stop for a moment and not sweep right into pushing.
  2. No more than one commit can be pushed. Pushing multiple commits at once is a dead giveaway that I merged in a work-in-progress branch, instead of the polished and tested final branch that should be distributed. There is no way around this check except to do one commit at a time.

I posted the hook as a gist.

Everyone makes mistakes, but this is one mistake I’m happy to make less often. The hook is enforcing a higher level of discipline, and hopefully, in the end, will become obsolete as I adopt better habits.

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