Remote Work Tip #3: Make an effective work area

In my first remote work tip post I talked about creating a separation between work and non-work. Part of that is having a place in your home that is only for work, and nothing else. That modest physical separation helps with the mental part of the separation.

If you were working in an office, you’d have a desk set up with the usual set of equipment. Working remotely shouldn’t be much different: Set up an effective area for remote work, with elements like a work area in an office. Your couch is probably not the best environment for getting down to business, no matter how comfortable it is.

Desk

For example, I am a software engineer. So, I have a big (not enormous, this is in my house after all) monitor sitting on a desk, into which I plug my closed laptop, and I have a high quality keyboard and mouse to use all day. I’m not spending all day hunched over my little laptop screen, typing away on a merely OK keyboard. What I have at home is, in some ways, actually nicer than the bog standard equipment I’d have in an office (before I’d swap it out, anyway).

Don’t forget to use a good office chair. It’s easy at home to just haul out a cheap folding chair or stool, but you’ll be sitting in this thing for hours, so just like you should have a good mattress for all the time you spend sleeping, you should be kind to your body with quality seating.

When you are working remotely, you need to pay special attention to the technology that enables audio and video chat: webcam, microphone or headset, and speakers. In an office you might not have any of that, since you could always go off to meet in a conference room, but they’re obviously essential for remote work. Pay special attention to the webcam and microphone / headset quality, since those affect how you are presented up on that screen at your home office. It’s much more desirable to have a clear, crisp image of you up there than a low-grade, pixelated image; to others, it feels more like you’re there with them as part of the team.

Speaking of webcams, do make sure that the view behind you isn’t embarrassing. It doesn’t have to be perfectly clean and formal-looking, but there shouldn’t be piles of laundry, greasy tool racks, or questionable posters in view of the audience. The view from your webcam is essentially “your office” as far as everyone else is concerned, so just like it’s important to get dressed, your walls should be presentable.

I’ve found that I don’t really need to work with paper much beyond taking notes; remote work naturally lends itself to working with online documents. If you still need to deal with writing on dead trees, though, also invest in a decent printer or multi-function device (printer / scanner). I can say that they are still as complicated and touchy as they’ve ever been, so it might be tough to find one that’s good quality, but give it your best shot.

Beyond the tech, make sure you have the usual office supplies around that you need, like paper, pens and pencils, scissors, a stapler, necessary cables, all that. It’s the same stuff you’d have in drawers in your office desk. When I travel to one of my company’s offices, I always check to see if there’s anything useful in the supply closet to bring home.

Try to keep your work area reasonably clean; this is actually pretty tough depending on your work style anyway, but it’s even harder when the area is in your house and no one else can see it. If you need to keep papers around, get a filing cabinet or some other sort of organizer. Put books in a shelf or cabinet, not in a crooked stack. Wipe down the area once in a while. It feels better to work in an environment that wouldn’t make your mom worry about you when she sees it.

Also, don’t forget to dress up your space with knickknacks, office toys, artwork, or whatever else you like to have around you. Again, this would be just like what you’d do in an office. If you’re going to spend eight or so hours a day in the area, you might as well make it pleasant to look at. Bonus: since most of your work area is off-webcam, you have a lot more freedom to decorate.

Finally, pay attention to the lighting and ambient sound in your work area. Avoid working in spaces with a lot of ruckus nearby, like just off your kitchen. Since you’re not in an office, you don’t need to deal with horrendous fluorescent lighting, so use a good lamp or a few LED strips for backlighting, or whatever you find pleasant. The light and sound around you matters a lot for those video chats, too; ensure that there’s enough light for you to be seen by, and little enough noise that you can be heard.

See if your employer has a budget for remote workers to purchase equipment (they are saving money on office space anyway), or if they will otherwise reimburse you for home office purchases; that’ll help take the bite out of the cost for bigger items you decide to acquire. If not, then just think of it as spending some of the money you’re saving on gas, parking, and lunches, except you get to keep what you purchase.

Having a highly customized work space is one of the many perks of working remotely, so optimize it for what you need and where you’d like to spend your work days.

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